Cakes A World Tour of Tradition

A wedding day is a momentous occasion for any couple and they want it all to be perfect. Whether they choose to walk down the path of tradition or add in their own modern twist every wedding day is truly unique. No matter where you live in the world there are various traditions you try to incorporate in to your wedding preparations. Even if you are being original you still opt for some of the traditions associated with your place of birth. For example, in Scotland all the men tend to wear traditional attire at a wedding called a kilt or in Greece the folk custom of smashing plates is normal for a couple’s big day.

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One of the biggest traditions that many couples opt for on their special day is the wedding cakes. In many cultures the cake is not only traditional but it symbolizes commitment and love between the pair for the future of their marriage. Here are some of the traditional cakes that you may see at a wedding in one of the following countries.

Indonesia:

They eat a cake called a ‘Kek Lapis’ at Indonesian weddings. It is a cake made up of layer upon layer of chocolate and vanilla and dates right back to the Dutch colonial period. Still as popular as ever it now has the modern twist of cinnamon or nutmeg added to it for a touch of spice.

Denmark:

The Danes like a beautiful Cornucopia cake on their big day. It is an almond and marzipan cake made in to the shape of a ring and filled with either sorbet, candy or fruit. The cake is then topped with fresh cream or icing.

Greece:

As well as smashing crockery the people of Greece enjoy a flourless almond cake at weddings. The cake is then filled with vanilla custard and fruit and topped with sliced roasted almonds. Many of the traditional cakes have sesame seeds, honey and quince added to them before serving. These 3 things are said to symbolize enduring love and commitment between husband and wife

Iceland:

Their traditional cake (known as kranzakaka) is more of a work of art than a cake. It begins as a ring of almond pastries piled one on top of the other till it eventually makes a large pyramid shape. The hollow centre of the pyramid is generally filled with chocolates.

Italy:

An Italian wedding cake is called a ‘Zuppa Inglese’. It consists of pound cake which is sliced and generously filled with chocolate custard, rum cream and a variety of fruits. The cake is then topped of elegantly with flowers made from royal icing and dusted with icing sugar.

Ireland/Scotland:

The Celts like to serve a traditional fruitcake at weddings. It is usually a three-tiered cake which has been soaked in brandy or whiskey before being dried out and covered with layers of marzipan and royal icing. Due to the alcohol content these cakes can be preserved and eaten up to a year after the wedding if stored in an air tight tin. Many couples eat a slice on their first wedding anniversary.

Lithuania:

At a wedding in Lithuania you could expect to see a ‘Sakotis’ cake. This unique cake is made from a cookie like dougn and once cooked resembles a small Christmas tree. The peak of the cake is usually topped with fresh flowers or herbs before serving.

There are too many wedding cakes to mention but the one thing they all have in common is that they are all a tasty traditions we must uphold for years to come!

https://www.theknot.com/content/a-world-tour-of-wedding-cake-traditions